Author Archives: acoaxet22

Preventing Parasites in Pets

Flea Prevention
The easiest and most effective way to prevent fleas and ticks is by using a monthly flea and tick preventative. However, fleas thrive in warm environments, and they may lay dormant in your house; fleas and their eggs can be commonly found in carpeting, bedding, and furniture. If a flea infestation has already occurred in your house, preventives would be needed year-round.
To avoid a flea infestation, your pet must be on flea preventatives and be given the preventative consistently for six consecutive months. Many medications are in a combined form with the monthly heartworm medication. Not only is this convenient, but it reduces the cost of two medications! Although fleas are more prevalent in summer months, they can survive year-round in a home.
Tick Prevention
Ticks can transmit serious diseases such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Ehrlichiosis, and Anaplasmosis. Many of these diseases have symptoms that are vague and/or mild until the disease has progressed. Many flea and tick preventatives starts killing ticks upon contact and will kill all four North American species of ticks (Deer tick, Brown dog tick, American dog tick and the Lone Star tick).
Heartworm Prevention
Heartworm disease is another dangerous condition to dogs and cats; although heartworm disease is preventable, it can be potentially fatal. With this disease, parasites attach themselves to the heart, and can cause symptoms such as persistent cough, fatigue, reduced appetite, and weight loss. We can help you protect your pet from heartworm disease with daily or monthly preventatives, including tablets and chewables, topicals, and a six-month injectable product available only for dogs. All of these methods are extremely effective, and when administered properly on a timely schedule, heartworm infection can be completely prevented.
Call us today to learn more about monthly preventatives, and how to protect your pet from fleas, ticks, and heartworm.

Winter Tips for Pets

Cold Weather Tips for Your Pet

Winters in the Northeast can be downright brutal – with the freezing temps and biting winds, it’s important to make sure that your dog or cat stays safe and warm during the cold weather months. Acoaxet Veterinary Clinic has some helpful tips to keep your pets safe this winter.

  • Smaller dogs and dogs with short coats often feel more comfortable wearing sweaters or jackets to keep them warm. Although dogs with long or thick coats do better in colder weather, precautions should still be taken while out for walks or during exercise.
  • Never leave dogs or cats outdoors for a prolonged amount of time when there is a drop in temperature. Windchills can also drastically affect the temperature and pose a serious threat to pets that are outside for an extended amount of time.
  • Many cats will seek refuge from the cold by crawling under the hood of a car. Cats and other small animals are drawn to the warm hoods of cars that have been recently parked. It’s advisable to double check to see if any animals are hiding underneath your vehicle.
  • Salt used to melt ice and snow can be irritating to the pads of your dog’s feet. Make sure to wipe your pet’s feet before they have a chance to lick the salt, which can cause irritation to the mouth.
  • Always supervise your pet while near driveways, garages, or roads where they could come in contact with harmful chemicals such as antifreeze. Many companies have added bittering agents to deter pets from consuming it, but even products without bittering agents are extremely dangerous to pets.

Keep in mind, every pet has a different level of tolerance to cold weather, but in general if it is uncomfortably cold for us, it is likely uncomfortable for pets as well. Call us immediately if your dog or cat is experiencing a cold weather-related emergency.

Protect Your Pet from Fleas, Ticks, and Heartworm

As the warmer months are approaching, it’s important to start protecting your pet and home from fleas and ticks. Fleas live outdoors and hitchhike their way inside on pets or people. Fleas live in moist, shady areas, including lawn thatch, mulch, leaf litter, woodpiles, crawl spaces, and under porches or decks. Fleas also thrive on common wildlife such as squirrels, rabbits, groundhogs, and opossums that can spread fleas to your pet.

Flea Prevention

The easiest and most effective way to prevent fleas and ticks is by using a monthly flea and tick preventative. However, fleas thrive in warm environments, and they may lay dormant in your house; fleas and their eggs can be commonly found in carpeting, bedding, and furniture. If a flea infestation has already occurred in your house, preventives would be needed year-round.

To avoid a flea infestation, your pet must be on flea preventatives and be given the preventative consistently for six consecutive months. Many medications are in a combined form with the monthly heartworm medication. Not only is this convenient, but it reduces the cost of two medications! Although fleas are more prevalent in summer months, they can survive year-round in a home.

Tick Prevention

Ticks can transmit serious diseases such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Ehrlichiosis, and Anaplasmosis. Many of these diseases have symptoms that are vague and/or mild until the disease has progressed. Many flea and tick preventatives starts killing ticks upon contact and will kill all four North American species of ticks (Deer tick, Brown dog tick, American dog tick and the Lone Star tick).

Heartworm Prevention

Heartworm disease is another dangerous condition to dogs and cats; although heartworm disease is preventable, it can be potentially fatal. With this disease, parasites attach themselves to the heart, and can cause symptoms such as persistent cough, fatigue, reduced appetite, and weight loss. We can help you protect your pet from heartworm disease with daily or monthly preventatives, including tablets and chewables, topicals, and a six-month injectable product available only for dogs. All of these methods are extremely effective, and when administered properly on a timely schedule, heartworm infection can be completely prevented.

For more information about protecting your pet from fleas, ticks, and heartworm this season, call us today to speak with one of our staff members – we are here to help!

February is National Pet Dental Health Month!

Since February is National Pet Dental Health Month, it’s a great time to schedule your dog or cat’s dental exam and professional cleaning. Our veterinarians will perform an evaluation of all teeth and gums, and thorough cleaning that includes the removal of plaque and tartar. Your pet will be comfortable and safe under gentle anesthesia to keep your pet free of discomfort throughout the dental procedure.

We can also help you find the perfect at-home dental care option that fits your lifestyle and the needs of your pet. At-home dental care options include: teeth brushing, dental rinses and gels, dental diets, and dental chew toys. Call us today for more information on our dental services and caring for your pet’s teeth.

Clinical Signs of Pet Dental Disease

Your pet cannot tell you when they have a dental problem, making it difficult for you to know when they need a treatment. Bad breath is often the first sign of dental disease that you will notice. The same bacteria that causes bad breath, if left untreated, can spread through the blood stream and damage the kidneys, heart and possibly other organs. Frequent, at least yearly, oral exams and preventative professional dental cleaning, scaling and polishing to keep your pet’s mouth healthy and pain-free. There are other signs of dental disease in your pet, including:

  • Bad breath
  • Salivating excessively
  • Pawing at mouth
  • Dropping food or running away from food dish
  • Loose teeth or teeth that are discolored or covered in tartar
  • Your pet shies away from you when touched in the mouth area
  • Bleeding from the mouth
  • If your pet shows any of the following symptoms, call me right away as your pet may be suffering from painful dental disease.

If your pet shows any of the following symptoms, call us right away as your pet may be suffering from painful dental disease.

Welcome to Acoaxet Veterinary Clinic’s Blog!

Now that summer has come and gone, it’s time to curl up and enjoy these colder months with friends and family. The holidays are the perfect time for delicious food, gift giving, and of course – lots of snuggling! But before we get to all the fun stuff, it’s important to go over a few tips to have a safe holiday season.

Food Safety
Small portions of lean meats such as chicken, turkey, and beef make an ideal treat for cats. Make sure the meat is cooked to the proper temperature, and be sure to check for bones. It’s best to remove the excess skin and fat, and avoid meats that have spices, seasonings, and oils. Steamed or baked vegetables such as carrots, green beans, or asparagus also make a great snack for your pet.

Foods that were prepared with rich ingredients like mayonnaise can lead to an upset stomach. Other ingredients like garlic and chives cause digestion problems, especially if a large quantity is consumed. Onions cause damage to the red blood cells, and are extremely poisonous to cats. Onion poisoning can have serious effects such as sluggishness, weight loss, and anemia.

Remember – it’s important to let everyone in your family know which foods are safe and which ones can cause a tummy ache. With a little caution, you can eliminate the risk of illness and still give your pet delicious treats!

Holiday Decorations

Common holiday decorations can be a source of danger for cats. Plants like lilies and daffodils are highly toxic to cats; symptoms include digestive upset, heart arrhythmia, kidney failure, convulsions, or even death. Holly and mistletoe are also toxic plants that can cause vomiting and diarrhea, although serious side effects typically occur only if large quantities are ingested. Despite their reputation, American poinsettias are not deadly to pets and only cause mild stomach irritability.

If your family has a fir, pine, or spruce Christmas tree, be sure to cover the water. Pesticides and fertilizer that keep the water fresh can make your cat very ill. Even if you have an artificial tree, pets may still chew or eat the needles, so it’s important to watch for any changes in their behavior such as a difference in activity, appetite, and water consumption as well as vomiting or diarrhea.

The holiday season also means lots of gifts wrapped with shiny ribbon and sparkly decorations hanging on the tree. Not surprisingly, these flashy adornments are extremely appealing for curious cats who think they’ve found the perfect new toy! String, ribbon, and other thin objects (also known as linear foreign bodies) can pose a serious threat to cats and kittens if swallowed accidentally. Linear foreign bodies can become wrapped around the intestines which could cause severe health problems, or even death. Like young children, kittens should never have toys with detachable parts or toys that are small enough to swallow. And remember – never let your kitten or cat play with string or ribbon, especially unsupervised.